Unfair Comparisons on Cost of Living

I’m livid after reading Marketwatch’s recent article on cost of living differences, in which it tries to make a blanket comparison between Asian cities and American/European ones.

The key part is in how they designed the study:

The study rated the cities according to how expensive it is to buy basic items there at supermarkets, mid-priced stores and specialty outlets, using the price of food, drinks, clothing, recreation and entertainment and the cost of buying and running a car (including the cost of gasoline).

It also includes recurring expenses, including the cost of renting a home, utility bills, private schools and domestic help.

I understand why they’re doing this – to create an apples to apples comparison. However, there’s a reason the government changed the index of inflation to account for substitutions. Essentially, to have the same or better lifestyle in an Asian city vs an American one, you can go without certain things. The cost of owning and operating a car in Tokyo, Singapore,¬†or Hong Kong is exorbitant because of incentives/taxes against congestion. Plus you don’t need a car to get around anywhere. It’s actually probably faster to take the metro/subway to avoid the surface congestion. Whereas in an American city you absolutely need a car to live.

Another aspect is private schools. I understand why they’d want to keep that in the comparison – the article is geared at high powered corporate expats who want to replicate a western lifestyle in Asia (note that they include domestic help in the calculations). However, again in the US you need to send your kids to a private school to get any kind of decent education. Not so in Asia. There, the locals hardly ever do so because public schools are so good (extremely competitive by world standards). This is anther example of a cost that’s not experienced evenly between Asia and America.

Finally, I’m not sure how they calculate food, but in my experience food in Japan (assuming you eat Japanese style meals) is much cheaper, tastier, and of better quality than the equivalent American ones. Restaurants are also cheaper, mostly due to not having to pay tip.

My gripes about this article are similar to my wife’s experience moving back to the US from Asia.

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