To Make Money in Real Estate, Follow Millennials

One big theme I harp on is that the new demographic bulge of millennials reaching adulthood (their peak spending years) will drive the success or failure of companies. Those who can adapt and cater to changing tastes stand to do well, while other who fail or cling to dying cohorts will be relegated to the dustbins of history.

Real estate has been one of the things on my mind in recent days, and it is without a doubt that millennials are influencing how future communities and properties are designed. Take this for instance:

“What millennials want are places that have a vibrancy, where you … can shop, go out to bars, walk, and bike,” says Lynn Richards, president and CEO of the Congress for the New Urbanism, a Chicago-based advocacy group for more pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods.

(…)

“For a very long time we built up our towns and villages and cities to drive” in, says transportation consultant David Fields with San Francisco–based Nelson/Nygaard Consulting Associates, adding that even drivers like to park their cars and walk around. “People ultimately want choice.” He says demand for biking-accessible communities is currently the highest he has ever seen.

Developers are taking note. Communities in the suburbs that chose to design for driving (I’m looking at you, Orange County) will suffer in the future as the new generations choose to live in walkable high-density places with plenty of amenities. This means that forward-looking cities like Portland, Denver, Austin, and Vancouver will reap the rewards (and they are, in terms of skyrocketing real estate prices)

As the article notes:

Developers and builders are taking note. They are offering bike storage facilities, valet, repair service, and even wash stations in fancy apartment and condo buildings to lure younger buyers and renters.

Crescent Communities, which builds subdivisions, homes, and apartment buildings across the Southeast, looks for cities and towns whose streets are lined with sidewalks and dedicated bike paths.

That’s because the No. 1 thing potential buyers of all ages want in their communities is walkability, the builder learned through surveys it conducts regularly. So Crescent looks for communities that already have those amenities in place to which it can link up its new buildings and developments.

While those hot areas are already expensive now, they may still have room to grow. What’s more rewarding is to look for communities that are still relatively affordable but which have the potential to be the next “hot” city where millennials flock to. I like to look for college towns close to large cities with good public transportation, a fun pub culture, and close to the outdoors (or at least with biking trails and green spaces).

Some potentials:

  • Fort Collins, CO
  • Madison, WI
  • Asheville, NC
  • Salt Lake City, UT
  • Bend, OR
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