Musings on Lucrative Traditional (and Untraditional) Jobs

Shifting gears now, I will now raise some recent examples of lucrative traditional jobs and how eye-popping their pay can be. Yes, I’ll be using some real world numbers here.

  1. Uber drivers: This article show the reality of how workers from all over rush to SF to earn the Bay Area premium (as a freelance taxi driver) which comes out to about $7 per 12 minutes, before expenses, which is much more than what someone unskilled can make in the Central Valley or Sacramento. What is striking is that they can make as much as $1500 per day, as the article states, though it’s work working hard and being opportunistic in monitoring for surge pricing. At the same time, they need to keep their expenses low by
  2. Temp workers: Don’t think of these guys as just lowly paid undocumented immigrants. Some of the most lucrative positions out there can be found by filling in as short-term workers, especially if you have specialized skills. But there are some out there that don’t neen need skills, just willingess to work in “undesirable” areas. Examples of this include a friend of a friend who went to Alaska to work in the canneries as a regular laborer. Hours were long and the environment was unforgiving (if pristine). He worked hard (16 hour days and a dangerous line of work) but took home $50,000 in 3 months. My book has other examples of geographic arbitrage opportunities like this. I’ll keep an eye out for more “gold rush boom” opportunities that arise and let you know on this blog.
  3. Nurses: You can get one of these degrees after just 2 years at a community college, so it’s an insanely accessible career path. You need to learn some protocols and get some practice, but at the end of the day it doesn’t involve deep cognitive processing. Things also get easier with practice and longevity, making life and work easier with time. There’s also great career stability and a nationwide shortage. Oh, and the schedule (3 shifts per week) can’t be beat. Just today I learned that the pay starts at about $60-70 per hour and you can get 2.5x base pay for working “unseasonable hours” like weekends, holidays, nights, and as emergency call up.
  4. Corrections officers: Thanks to unions, the prison system in California is generously funded. Despite a declining prison population, you can get a very generous pay and pension package in corrections. The promotional website boasts six figure salaries starting out (after accounting for overtime and vacation/night pay), with a monthly stipend during your cadet training years. There’s even a controversial article on WSJ about whether being a prison guard is better than getting a degree from Harvard. Sure, if you go to work right away and keep your job without getting laid off. My perspective is that a Harvard degree gives you more flexibility and opens doors to more types of jobs, including more interesting and cognitive based ones that are more resistant to automation and outsourcing.
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