Follow Your [Profitable] Dreams, Redux

Short post here. In my last post, I mentioned that the best path that balances all factors contributing to happiness is to work hard in one’s 20s in a high paying job, then quit after becoming financially independent/self-sufficient to focus purely on one’s hobbies/passions without any financial constraints.

One of my favourite singers, Antje Duvekot, is doing this in her own life. She admittedly toured quite frequently when she was younger, only to tire of the road and long for a more settled existence. You can read her interview, which is quoted here:

You haven’t been touring as much lately.  Does that feel strange to you?  Or do you find that it’s helped bring some sense of normalcy to your life?

Well, I’m a lot poorer because of it. But a lot happier. I now live in Boston. I take Spanish classes, volunteer at an adult education center, lead the music program at the humanist hub, see friends, neighbors. My home is now not just another strange place I pass through on my way to another tour on my way to encounter more strangers (albeit with a better bed and no check-out time in the morning). It is now actually a place to me. There are no words for how important it is to human mental health to be able to build something in one place. Being perma-transient sucks balls. Plus the shows I play now feel wonderful. I am more present and playing for people feels more deliberate, like a true privilege, rather than a permanent state of refugee status. Not to be melodramatic or anything, lol. For melodrama see track 5 on the new record “Caffeinated Warriors,” about my growing hate-affair with the road. That being said, I am still touring a good amount, but I go out for a few days and come home, and I don’t do more than one away-tour a month with additional drivable shows sprinkled in. It’s been good for me and I think good for my art as well.

Later on in your career, making the tradeoff of sacrificing income for increased free time, hobbies, travel, and friends becomes worthwhile. It’s a lot easier if we’ve saved sufficiently ahead of time when young, to allow compounding to work its magic. This is precisely why I’m operating on a career taper, starting out at 1.3x full time and reducing my workload by one tenth every year until 0.5 (half time), and then working ad hoc at that point.

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