Don’t Do Something, Just Stand There

Another week, another all time in the stock market. North Korea’s saber rattling and the devastation wrought by the hurricanes don’t seem to have put a dent in the market’s relentless ascent. Furthermore, with this being the “most hated” bull market in history (or so they all say), things don’t seem primed for a major collapse. A mild pullback on the order of 5-10%? Sure, perhaps it will happen within the next year, but a major recession doesn’t seem to be in the cards.

What’s the best mentality for an average investor to have? The same as always – don’t change your long-term strategy due to short-term circumstances. Ignore the noise going on around you and robotically invest what you won’t touch in the next 5-10 years. The mantra that my mentor in medicine told me, which brings “do no harm” into the modern world, is encapsulated by the title of the post. Sometimes it’s simply better to do nothing than to react like a jumpy cat to every slight movement.

Take this advice of this article for instance:

“If you don’t want to invest in equities because you fear a market crash, then you should never be in equities, because equities always crash,” Ritholtz said, speaking at Morningstar’s annual ETF conference.

He noted that there was a bear market in equities—defined as a 20% drop from a peak—every five years, on average, although the recent market environment has been bereft of even much smaller declines. Current valuations have led to concerns that such a crash could be imminent, but “If you’re under [the age of] 50, you should be rooting for a market crash, because it would be nice to have a 20% discount and then 20 years to compound that discount.”

He added, “there’s no escaping this: markets go up and down, that’s what they do. But if you’re still worried, you should significantly lower your expectations for future returns” by buying safer—but lower growth—alternatives. He noted that over the past century, U.S. stocks have returned about 10 times what Treasurys have, although they also experienced numerous massive selloffs over that time, something the government bonds hadn’t.

“The risk you assume when you buy equities is that there will be a significant drawdown in the 20 to 30 years you own them. But you get rewarded for that risk. Treasurys don’t have the same kind of drawdowns, but don’t deliver the same kind of returns.”

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