Does Hard Work Pay Off?

I’m doing a bit of reading these days, and several passages from selected works stand out to me as epiphanies into the easy road of life.

Consider two siblings. The older brother works hard, studies, keeps his head down, gets good grades, graduates with a degree in engineering or accounting, and goes on to a satisfying middle class life with a steady job and income stream.

The younger brother hangs out with his friends, gets mediocre grades, and goes to a typical state school. There, he makes friends and through them joins a startup and eventually strikes it rich and makes it on boards of major corporations.

What is the difference between the two? A healthy dose of luck and circumstance to be sure, but there’s a fundamental philosophic difference between their approaches. The older brother tries to do things through the “official” recognized paths. The younger brother tried to find short cuts in life. In today’s world, there’s a lot of room for backdoor negotiations in smoke filled rooms, nepotism, and corruption. Going through the hush hush unofficial pathway can lead to greater riches for a lower price.

Take for example this passage from the book Hillbilly Elegy that I’m reading now:

It was pretty clear that there was some mysterious force at work, and I had just tapped into it for the first time. I had always thought that when you need a job, you look online for job postings. And then you submit a dozen resumes. And then you hope that someone calls you back. if you’re lucky, maybe a friend puts your resume at the top of the pile. if you’re qualified for a very high-demand profession, like accounting, maybe the job search comes a bit easier. But the rules are basically the same.

The problem is, virtually everyone who plays by those rules fails. That week of interviews showed me that successful people are playing an entirely different game. They don’t flood the job market with resumes, hoping that some employer will grace them with an interview. They network. They email a friend of a friend to make sure their name gets the look it deserves. They have their uncles call old college buddies. They have their school’s career service office set up interviews months in advance on their behalf. They have parents tell them how to dress, what to say,and whom to schmooze.

In the modern world, it’s not about how much you know, but who you know. The best jobs are usually not posted, or if they are it’s just for theater. The company probably has already identified an internal candidate or a friend of a friend for the spot. It sucks for those of us who bury our heads in the books and stay on the straight and narrow, but at least we now know what to change to be successful.


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