How to Buy a Car (From an Expert)

I somehow got subscribed to the daily Quora mailing list with interesting questions and answers. The one for today was about how to get a good deal when buying a car. Pasted here is the entirety of the response:

Let me make your life easy (I own a few dealerships). It takes 5 minutes. Once you know exactly what kind of car you want, simply go to the dealer, a salesmen will greet you. Tell him you’d like to go inside and talk about the car your interested in. Go inside, tell him you’re comparing with two other brands but you like this one the best. Tell him, I’d like to buy this car now if you can match the other dealers’ offers which is $100 over invoice. Tell him kindly, “Please let your manager know my offer is $100 over invoice, which is what the other dealers offered me, and if he accepts, I’d like to see a copy of the invoice (which they must do legally – you’re welcome), and then we can wrap this up now and I’ll buy you lunch for your great service.” That’s it. Unless it’s a specialty car, it will go down just like that. If you’re paying cash, it’s a done deal 99.9%. If that doesn’t work, call the next town over, tell them you were offered $100 over invoice but you don’t like how they do business so want to go to the competitor. If they agree (which they will because the car biz is super competitive) ask them to email a copy of the invoice. Once they do, call them and tell them you’re on your way. Side note- best time to buy a car is New Years Eve, 2 hours before closing using this method….just tell them “Come on guys, let’s wrap this up quickly so we can all go spend time with our families.” It’s not as hard as people think. Believe me, the salesman just wants to sell a car, he cares more about closing the deals than anything else because if he doesn’t, he doesn’t get paid. Another note, the faster the deal, the better. And be POLITE, good salesman ARE expert salespeople and they’ll rip your head off without you knowing if you’re an ass. Oh, and all your friends who think they’re experts…are not! Even if you buy the car for 50 cents they’ll tell you that you’ve been screwed, lol. Buy a decent car for $100 over invoice and go home happy. And don’t over spend on cars, they all have four wheels….just get a good running car. The more you spend, the more they depreciate and they’re all worth $2500 in 10–15 years. This is advice for new cars. Used cars….offer 3k less than the asking price OR 500 over wholesale book whichever is less (use blue book online between trade-in & private party value)(pay cash)…also 5 minutes. But only do these if you’re ready to buy in that moment. Test drive all first. If you don’t have cash, get pre-approved at a credit union and take the letter to the dealer to solidify your seriousness. If you have bad credit….it’s the bank that will screw you, not the dealer. Also with bad credit, the dealer had to pay bank fees so they can’t come down as much on the price. Bank fees range from $500–$3000! depending on how bad your credit is. My thumb is tired now…good luck!

All I can say is that these recommendations make sense. I usually go through Costco Auto which gives a pre-fixed price, but direct bargaining with a dealer can work as well. Go in with a no nonsense attitude, have an anchoring price, and come prepared with a preapproved loan (or cash). That takes away the multiple possible ways that the dealer can screw you over. Be prepared to walk away if the dealer can’t meet your pre-established price though.

It also helps to go in at certain times of the year (4th of July sale, Christmas sale) at the end of the season when sales reps are trying to meet quotas. Also what can help is buying a model that is not that popular that the dealer is trying to move off the lot. Sedans right now are losing ground relative to SUVs and light trucks, so it’s a good time to scoop up one and go against the grain.

Of course, going for a slightly used car instead of a new one can save you money, as this post shows.

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Link Roundup: The Value of Hard Work

During times of plenty, when there are more interesting articles than I can do a feature review of, I will combine them into a single post called a link roundup. Here is one such event.

  1. The value of hard work. This reminds me of my time growing up in the crucible of competitiveness that is the Bay Area. Investments made in oneself through education and knowledge pays compound interest down the road, establishing a solid foundation for improved performance and confidence, that feed off each other in a virtuous cycle. Take for example a high school student taking summer classes to prepare for the next quarter’s math and reading classes. That person will get a leg up in results for the rest of his or her life, because of repeated exposure and increased familiarity, not to mention having an easier time in the class. Compared to someone like this, if you’re not working hard every day, you’re falling behind your peers. Just like in athletics, average is over. Every day you’re slacking or doing something else is a day falling behind your peer competitors.
  2. What do future jobs look like? The thinkers of yesterday and today have a vision for how the future looks, and it doesn’t bode well for some. Unskilled work will be replaced by robots. Technical and computer skills will become more valuable. Good future areas to specialize in include AI, robotics, and VR. At the same time, some jobs like in health care that deal with human emotions, where empathy is essential, will be relatively shielded from the effects of technology. But then again, you would know this from reading my book.
  3. As a corollary to the above, university students increasingly recognize the reality of a tough job market for graduates, and are tailoring their studies accordingly. This means fewer liberal arts graduates and more social science, business, engineering, and “trades” graduates. That’s probably a good thing for individual finances but a tragic loss for the country. After all, from their pen would have come art, literature, and poetry – the stuff that gives colour and meaning to life. That’s what separates us from somewhere like Singapore or India, which are
  4. If you have truly niche technical skills, you can make bank. Just look at blockchain developers. Btw, software is one of the fields where if you have the interest and the talent, you can teach yourself and get a great job without having a degree in the field. That’s the path my dad took.
  5. Here’s a great story of a self made web entrepreneur with the vision to establish a business reselling cheap Chinese toys from Alibaba to American consumers willing to pay more. Wait… why don’t Americans just buy directly from Alibaba? Doesn’t sound like a very sustainable business model but somehow it works.
  6. Concierge medicine is taking off, and whispers are that you can have a lucrative practice with low patient volume, if you cater to the rich and treat everyone like a VIP. It’s not my cup of tea, but I see disruptive potential in different delivery methods for health services. Target mini clinics are good, as is the underutilized format of telemedicine.
  7. I can’t harp on the concept of geographic arbitrage enough. By moving to a cheaper location, your dollars stretch so much further. Not only that, but your kids can grow up multicultural with foreign language skills, interesting life experiences, and a great prebuilt application essay for Ivy League schools telling them how unique you are.
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Luxury Is Cheaper than Land

Of all the innovative uses for geographic arbitrage, one of the most satisfying is monetizing one’s home and trading it for an itinerant life. That wanderlust can be satisfied in a variety of different ways. The online travel blogging community has made being a digital nomad in cheap areas like SE Asia and Latin America so commonplace that it’s become trite.

An interesting choice is to instead live on a cruise ship. It’s not just a way of life for the wealthy to live on a luxury boat like The World, but even worldwide voyages with one of the mass market lines (Princess, HAL, Oceania, etc) can be affordable, when considering all the expenses racked up on land in an expensive place like New York City.

At a certain point, if you own property in NYC and decide to rent it out, it may be able to generate enough income to subsidize all (or a great portion) of the cost of the cruise. And when you factor in food, entertainment, and travel all being bundled into the price of the cruise, it becomes an even better bargain.

Of course, this type of lifestyle is not appropriate for everyone. Not everyone likes life on a ship, whether due to claustrophobia, seasickness, or boredom. But it’s worthwhile knowing about the options to enhance life that others have found worthwhile and workable.

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Secrets of Wealthy Millennials

Is it just me or does Business Insider seem to be sliding into a paparazzi version of the staid Forbes magazine? The articles being published these days seem more like a weird hybrid of Moneyish and Gawker, with more sensationalist titles than the Daily Mail and plastered with more inline Instagram posts than TMZ.

Still, despite the descent into frivolity, there are some nuggets of truth and wisdom to be gleaned from their latest series on wealthy millennials.

The first story from BI is that of Ebony Horton. To summarize, she was a newly minted graduate making $38,000 a year in DC. She then went back to get an MBA and racked up a total of $220,000 in loans from undergrad + MBA. She freaked out at the amount, and came up with a plan to pay it all off by moving back to rural Illinois, lowering her cost of living, saving like crazy alongside her husband, buying rental property, and getting some opportune gifts from her family. Now 31, she’s debt free and ready to share her story in a book and go on the speaker circuit to make boatloads of money.

What can we take away from this?

  1. It helps to have rich parents who can support you, either directly financially or indirectly by providing free/subsidized shelter
  2. Being dual income (however miserly), no kids dramatically accelerates your savings trajectory
  3. If you set your mind to it, saving 75%-95% of after-tax income is possible
  4. Control lifestyle inflation (let your standard of living appreciate slowly) or it will ruin you
  5. Investing in the property market uses leverage to enhance the growth rate of your wealth

One of the topics in my book on finance is that in the modern age, there are a few viable paths to success. However, this book focused purely on wealth and its accumulation, the pursuit of which is unsustainable in the long term. One of my upcoming books will instead deep dive into the human mind and explore how we become happy. With that in mind, when thinking of work-life balance, there are two ways to go about it. One is to “finish” a high-paying career, accumulate boatloads of savings, and retire early. In short, this abbreviates the traditional working time and prolongs retirement. It can be very effective, as legions of FIRE (financial independence, retire early) adherents can attest. However, it requires significant discipline to accumulate that much savings so quickly.

The next BI story is that of two 30 year old teachers who managed to save $1 million after 8 years, and are now retired and travel the world. Isn’t that the dream of every young millennial these days? They did it by doing much of the same that Ebony did, only they had the advantage of minimal education debt. Their lucky break was to pick up houses in Las Vegas on the cheap in the depths of the real estate collapse, converting them to rentals. Gradually, the market bounced back and they were able to make more rental profit from the houses, which they used to buy yet more houses. Now they make $10000 per month on average from rent, balanced out against only $2000 per month in mortgage, letting them retire to pursue their passions.

The take away bullet points?

  1. Paying down debt is good, but it’s a lot better to not have debt and to divert savings into investment vehicles
  2. Being lucky (getting into real estate at the bottom, even before hedge funds) is better than being good
  3. Sometimes living in a lower cost of living area beats moving to a high cost area (Bay Area, London) to earn a high salary
  4. Buy a property and rent it out to others, letting them cover the cost of the mortgage (see my analysis of yield on equity here)

The other reasonable approach is to maintain the frugality but to intermix one’s working years with “fun” activities traditionally associated with retirement. This can come from working on cruise lines, at vacation resorts, as an English teacher abroad, etc (more examples of ways to do this are in my book). These jobs may not be high paying, but the cost of living is either low or completely subsidized such that significant savings are possible. Experiencing fun stuff as a tourist is expensive, because you duplicate costs such as housing by having to pay for a hotel and the mortgage back home, and other costs are more expensive (such as having to eat out every day). It’s a lot easier to see the same sights and go to events as a local, relying on cheaper longer term housing, cheaper grocery options, and public transportation.

On this point, BI ran not one but two (oh my how they like to recycle stories) articles about the same girl – Nina Ragusa. She took the fun road, working hard initially in multiple jobs to save up enough money to launch her career as a travel blogger. She gets to roam the world, doing the typical things on the well-trod road of teaching English in Thailand and working in the tourism sector in Australia (the working holiday visa for young people is a great boon). In essence, instead of slaving away at a desk job, she gets to live in vacation paradises, work freelance in a bunch of industries that aren’t that intense, and save a bit to boot. There are two possibilities for how she will end up. If she does well with her travel blog, she can spin that into a brand and partner with tour agencies as a promoter. The worst case scenario is that she returns to the US at some point having had a decade of amazing experiences and a small amount of savings.

You may wonder how young people can spend so much time and money on travel and not exhaust all their income or savings. For one, cost of living is so much lower for most places outside of the US, and low end wages (especially for the service sector in Australia, NZ) can be higher. Finally, many fun activities aren’t that costly. By working at a resort, you’re afforded the privilege of taking the kayak or surfboard out when you aren’t leading a tour, and sometimes can even use the company’s van for personal excursions. In a tropical paradise, many of the most fun activities are free. It’s so easy to get sucked into complacency living in these places.

Take home points for this case:

  1. For young people who want to have fun now and mix in a bit of the retired life with their youth, it’s hard to beat adventure travel and freelance work
  2. Geographic arbitrage wins again
  3. There’s an outside shot that you can create a sustainable brand/blog based around travel and never have to work again
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The Trend Towards Minimalism

Feels good to be vindicated, yet again, or perhaps my own behaviour is not so uncommon but merely representative of the prevailing attitude of my generation. After all, it’s “widely known” that Millennials value experiences over things.

As for retail, owners have to adapt or die. Innovative retail stores are experimenting with ways to blend a more experiential type of shopping with brands and goods. As the article recognizes:

“Shoppers are reaching a tipping point around American consumption,” it read. “Feelings of angst about acquiring too much ‘stuff’ is driving a shift toward purchasing experiences rather than things.”

Those of us who are involved in entrepreneurship recognize this. As the older generation dies out, Millennial preferences will increasingly drive profitable product lines. We see this in the traditional media, which initially resisted the move to digital (Napster was merely early) before eventually acquiescing (see: Hulu) to the tidal shift. Those that continue to resist (ESPN, Comcast) face declining revenues from cord cutters.

In general, being “light”, mobile, portable, flexible, and catering to the customer’s preferences for when, where, and how to consume something is the new name of the game. Amazon recognizes this. Old retail still tries to force someone to come into a brick and mortar store and be assailed by rude and unhelpful sales representatives. That’s not a winning approach.

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Follow Your Passions, After Your Career

The story of the Hong Kong banker who quit his job to work in humanitarian aid is truly inspiring and definitely relatable.

One question that Asian children (probably others as well, but I’m speaking from experience here) agonize over when growing up is whether to pursue something profitable (often at the behest of their parents), or something that they’re truly passionate about. It’s rare that these intersect, unless your passion is money. Many times, these kids get so immersed into their studies in school that they don’t even find their passion until much later in life. Then they are filled with regret and resentment.

My approach is to have the best of both worlds. Grind through school in your 20s and get out into a great career. Work overtime and make tons of money early. Guaranteed high income fields like banking and medicine are very suitable for this. The reason is that it’s easier to learn new things quickly when we’re still young. Also, money earned when young is more valuable because it has time to compound.

Do this when you’re young enough and you can emerge in your mid 30s with enough money to retire and live purely off your investments. Then it’s time to find and focus on your passion. I suggest at this point some combination of travel, volunteering, philanthropy, teaching/mentoring, and entrepreneurship. More details on this to come in my upcoming book on happiness.

Doing the opposite by finding your passion when young generally means you have a brief happy time in your adolescence, but at the cost of potential financial destitution in mid life. You also lose out on important things like compounded savings and moving up the career ladder. This can make you profoundly unhappy. One caveat remains. This option may be a good choice that maximizes happiness if you know you’ll die young.

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Does Hard Work Pay Off?

I’m doing a bit of reading these days, and several passages from selected works stand out to me as epiphanies into the easy road of life.

Consider two siblings. The older brother works hard, studies, keeps his head down, gets good grades, graduates with a degree in engineering or accounting, and goes on to a satisfying middle class life with a steady job and income stream.

The younger brother hangs out with his friends, gets mediocre grades, and goes to a typical state school. There, he makes friends and through them joins a startup and eventually strikes it rich and makes it on boards of major corporations.

What is the difference between the two? A healthy dose of luck and circumstance to be sure, but there’s a fundamental philosophic difference between their approaches. The older brother tries to do things through the “official” recognized paths. The younger brother tried to find short cuts in life. In today’s world, there’s a lot of room for backdoor negotiations in smoke filled rooms, nepotism, and corruption. Going through the hush hush unofficial pathway can lead to greater riches for a lower price.

Take for example this passage from the book Hillbilly Elegy that I’m reading now:

It was pretty clear that there was some mysterious force at work, and I had just tapped into it for the first time. I had always thought that when you need a job, you look online for job postings. And then you submit a dozen resumes. And then you hope that someone calls you back. if you’re lucky, maybe a friend puts your resume at the top of the pile. if you’re qualified for a very high-demand profession, like accounting, maybe the job search comes a bit easier. But the rules are basically the same.

The problem is, virtually everyone who plays by those rules fails. That week of interviews showed me that successful people are playing an entirely different game. They don’t flood the job market with resumes, hoping that some employer will grace them with an interview. They network. They email a friend of a friend to make sure their name gets the look it deserves. They have their uncles call old college buddies. They have their school’s career service office set up interviews months in advance on their behalf. They have parents tell them how to dress, what to say,and whom to schmooze.

In the modern world, it’s not about how much you know, but who you know. The best jobs are usually not posted, or if they are it’s just for theater. The company probably has already identified an internal candidate or a friend of a friend for the spot. It sucks for those of us who bury our heads in the books and stay on the straight and narrow, but at least we now know what to change to be successful.

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Follow Your [Profitable] Dreams, Redux

Short post here. In my last post, I mentioned that the best path that balances all factors contributing to happiness is to work hard in one’s 20s in a high paying job, then quit after becoming financially independent/self-sufficient to focus purely on one’s hobbies/passions without any financial constraints.

One of my favourite singers, Antje Duvekot, is doing this in her own life. She admittedly toured quite frequently when she was younger, only to tire of the road and long for a more settled existence. You can read her interview, which is quoted here:

You haven’t been touring as much lately.  Does that feel strange to you?  Or do you find that it’s helped bring some sense of normalcy to your life?

Well, I’m a lot poorer because of it. But a lot happier. I now live in Boston. I take Spanish classes, volunteer at an adult education center, lead the music program at the humanist hub, see friends, neighbors. My home is now not just another strange place I pass through on my way to another tour on my way to encounter more strangers (albeit with a better bed and no check-out time in the morning). It is now actually a place to me. There are no words for how important it is to human mental health to be able to build something in one place. Being perma-transient sucks balls. Plus the shows I play now feel wonderful. I am more present and playing for people feels more deliberate, like a true privilege, rather than a permanent state of refugee status. Not to be melodramatic or anything, lol. For melodrama see track 5 on the new record “Caffeinated Warriors,” about my growing hate-affair with the road. That being said, I am still touring a good amount, but I go out for a few days and come home, and I don’t do more than one away-tour a month with additional drivable shows sprinkled in. It’s been good for me and I think good for my art as well.

Later on in your career, making the tradeoff of sacrificing income for increased free time, hobbies, travel, and friends becomes worthwhile. It’s a lot easier if we’ve saved sufficiently ahead of time when young, to allow compounding to work its magic. This is precisely why I’m operating on a career taper, starting out at 1.3x full time and reducing my workload by one tenth every year until 0.5 (half time), and then working ad hoc at that point.

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Musings on Lucrative Traditional (and Untraditional) Jobs

Shifting gears now, I will now raise some recent examples of lucrative traditional jobs and how eye-popping their pay can be. Yes, I’ll be using some real world numbers here.

  1. Uber drivers: This article show the reality of how workers from all over rush to SF to earn the Bay Area premium (as a freelance taxi driver) which comes out to about $7 per 12 minutes, before expenses, which is much more than what someone unskilled can make in the Central Valley or Sacramento. What is striking is that they can make as much as $1500 per day, as the article states, though it’s work working hard and being opportunistic in monitoring for surge pricing. At the same time, they need to keep their expenses low by
  2. Temp workers: Don’t think of these guys as just lowly paid undocumented immigrants. Some of the most lucrative positions out there can be found by filling in as short-term workers, especially if you have specialized skills. But there are some out there that don’t neen need skills, just willingess to work in “undesirable” areas. Examples of this include a friend of a friend who went to Alaska to work in the canneries as a regular laborer. Hours were long and the environment was unforgiving (if pristine). He worked hard (16 hour days and a dangerous line of work) but took home $50,000 in 3 months. My book has other examples of geographic arbitrage opportunities like this. I’ll keep an eye out for more “gold rush boom” opportunities that arise and let you know on this blog.
  3. Nurses: You can get one of these degrees after just 2 years at a community college, so it’s an insanely accessible career path. You need to learn some protocols and get some practice, but at the end of the day it doesn’t involve deep cognitive processing. Things also get easier with practice and longevity, making life and work easier with time. There’s also great career stability and a nationwide shortage. Oh, and the schedule (3 shifts per week) can’t be beat. Just today I learned that the pay starts at about $60-70 per hour and you can get 2.5x base pay for working “unseasonable hours” like weekends, holidays, nights, and as emergency call up.
  4. Corrections officers: Thanks to unions, the prison system in California is generously funded. Despite a declining prison population, you can get a very generous pay and pension package in corrections. The promotional website boasts six figure salaries starting out (after accounting for overtime and vacation/night pay), with a monthly stipend during your cadet training years. There’s even a controversial article on WSJ about whether being a prison guard is better than getting a degree from Harvard. Sure, if you go to work right away and keep your job without getting laid off. My perspective is that a Harvard degree gives you more flexibility and opens doors to more types of jobs, including more interesting and cognitive based ones that are more resistant to automation and outsourcing.
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Is Social Media Conducive to Success?

I’m shaking my head at young kids these days, stuck on their phones, obtaining (and believing) all their information from the internet and social media, regardless of how authoritative the sources. At times, I feel like an old fart, stuck with dialup and landline phones, grumbling about the decline of Usenet and email, and not yet adopting the new technology.

But really, more often than not, social media makes you dumb. It’s a time waster where friends tempt you seemingly glamorous lifestyles, which are in reality carefully cultivated slices of their life. Being exposed to those things can lead to depression and endless peer competition. By focusing too much on the virtual life, we lose track of reality. Tangible things like reading, studying, exercising, and connecting with people in the real world become lost. We lose motivation and don’t spend time doing productive things.

However, given the large audience base, it’s unavoidable for big companies to have a presence on social media. This also applies to small businesses that we start, where viral marketing can really enhance growth. After all, who can turn down free advertising.

The best balance that I’ve found is to have accounts on Facebook and Twitter, and have them be driven by bots. Automatically post articles and such on these sites, automatically add people, accept all friend requests/follows, but minimize the temptation of actually personally opening the app or site to send messages to others.

Maybe if enough people adopt this strategy, the entire Twitterverse will be filled with bots spamming other bots!

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